Songs of the Hebrides: Island Studies and Song Resource Guide

Resource Guide to accompany island studies research  ‘Scotland’s Songs of the Hebrides’ by Ray Burnett and Kathryn A. Burnett  in Island Songs and Singers: A Global Repertoire of Roots and Routes edited by Godfrey Baldacchino, Rowan and Littlefield/Scarecrow Press. (2011).

A research resource link has also been developed here to be accessed either on its own, or in association with the book chapter. The resource page can be accessed  as a PDF file  by clicking here: Songs of the Hebrides SCIS UWS Resource Guide  as part of the University of the West of Scotland’s committment to knowledge exchange the resource guide detailed here in PDF form is provided as an aid to readers of the Burnett & Burnett, 2011  chapter and others interested in the topic of the song tradition of the Hebrides, its role in island society, its transmission and its transformation. In particular it is designed to act as a guide to online sources where the songs, their transmission and their transformation can actually be heard or seen through archival audio tapes, archival film and video clips and contemporary performances. Some links to text material, i.e. lyrics and their translations, the transcript recollections of collectors and detailed scholarly editions of specific sings are also included.

For convenience the sources are arranged under five headings: The Songs and the Tradition; The Collectors; The ‘Songs of the Hebrides’ and their Transformation; The Gaelic Revival and the Contemporary Scene; Selected Song and Culture Projects.  Needless to say there is significant overlap between each heading but it is hoped that once the reader is familiar with the sources they will be able to pursue their own specific lines of research enquiry across these headings which are primarily used as a matter of convenience.  The authors are aware that many other links and resources could be detailed in respect of this rich field and would hope to further develop both the current guide  and  further possible research links and collaboration.

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